Being active together

Being active together

Moving more doesn’t have to be a solo affair. Being active with others has social and mental health benefits, and some people simply find it more fun.

Tania has found that daughter has helped her enjoy being active, whether they’re dancing around to songs they love or getting competitive playing the Wii®. Simone finds that going on walks with her partner makes them more enjoyable, as they’re doing something together. And Zahoor makes time to be active with his grandkids, going to the park with them to play cricket. Try moving around with your family and friends. You can make a day out of it for free at a National Trust site; you can find more information on this in the relevant resources section.

There are classes, clubs, and other group based across England that you may be able to join. Depending on where you are, some of these may be free, low cost and/or aimed at people starting out. Search online for activities in your area to see if there’s something right for you. You can also find information on Group Fitness on the This Girl Can site, which is linked to in our list of relevant resources.

In some instances, there may be a group set up specifically to support people with your condition. When in recovery from surgery, Ellie found a dragon boating team near her made up of breast cancer survivors and their supporters. As another example, Chris set up the first football team in the UK where every player has diabetes, allowing the team to connect over their condition as well as sport. These sorts of environments can provide chances to move in addition to meeting people with similar experiences to you.